The Good News

Discussion of the Best News in the World, the Gospel of Jesus, and related topics

Tag Archives: Jesus

Revelation 4

I love Revelation 4.   I also love Revelation 5.   Revelation 4 has what I want to focus on.  It needs no commentary.  Just take it for what God may say to you.

The Throne in Heaven

After this I looked, and behold, a door standing open in heaven! And the first voice, which I had heard speaking to me like a trumpet, said, “Come up here, and I will show you what must take place after this.” At once I was in the Spirit, and behold, a throne stood in heaven, with one seated on the throne.And he who sat there had the appearance of jasper and carnelian, and around the throne was a rainbow that had the appearance of an emerald. Around the throne were twenty-four thrones, and seated on the thrones were twenty-four elders, clothed in white garments, with golden crowns on their heads. From the throne came flashes of lightning, and rumblings[a] and peals of thunder, and before the throne were burning seven torches of fire, which are the seven spirits of God, and before the throne there was as it were a sea of glass, like crystal. Read more of this post

Five Powerful Prayers from Scripture

What are your favorite prayers recorded by the people of God?

 

If you ever feel at a loss for what to pray, there’s no better guidebook for petitions to our Heavenly Father than the very book He wrote—the Bible. Almost every book in there contains a plea or request, and page after page points to another reason we need a Savior. So, when you feel like you just don’t have words, turn first to the Word.

Although we could list hundreds of prayers, we plucked out five of our favorites to show just how filled to the brim the Bible is with ways to call upon our great God.

The Prayer of Jabez (1 Chronicles 4:10)

When the author of Chronicles dutifully provides us with a list of Judah’s descendants, he can’t help but stop himself. Right in the midst of all these names, he comes to Jabez, a man he wants us to notice, a man of true honor. If you’ve ever felt like you’ve caused pain or if you’ve ever wanted to believe that God can do more than you can ask or imagine, this prayer is for you:

“Jabez cried out to the God of Israel, ‘Oh, that you would bless me and enlarge my territory! Let your hand be with me, and keep me from harm so that I will be free from pain.’ And God granted his request.”

The Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9–13)

This prayer is the true classic. Most of us have said this prayer and could likely recite it right now. But there’s much more to this model that Jesus gave us than rote recitation. This is a prayer with real power: God’s kingdom coming, God’s will being done, all that we need for the day. It’s truly power packed. So, take a closer look at what it teaches:

“Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name.
Your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.”

Jonah’s Prayer for Salvation (Jonah 2:2–9)

We may never be swallowed by a great fish, but we can still experience the shame and regret that Jonah felt after he ran from God. The prophet’s plea to the Father provides a poignant scaffolding for our own prayers of repentance. And remember that God heard and answered this humble, honest prayer:

“In my distress I called to the Lord,
and he answered me.
From deep in the realm of the dead I called for help,
and you listened to my cry.

You hurled me into the depths,
into the very heart of the seas,
and the currents swirled about me;
all your waves and breakers
swept over me.

I said, ‘I have been banished
from your sight;
yet I will look again
toward your holy temple.’

The engulfing waters threatened me,
the deep surrounded me;
seaweed was wrapped around my head.

To the roots of the mountains I sank down;
the earth beneath barred me in forever.
But you, Lord my God,
brought my life up from the pit.

“When my life was ebbing away,
I remembered you, Lord,
and my prayer rose to you,
to your holy temple.

“Those who cling to worthless idols
turn away from God’s love for them.

But I, with shouts of grateful praise,
will sacrifice to you.
What I have vowed I will make good.
I will say, ‘Salvation comes from the Lord.’”

David’s Prayer for Deliverance (Psalm 3)

This one was a tough choice because the Psalms are stuffed full of cries and petitions. If you ever want a primer for prayer, you can’t go wrong with this wisdom book. But we chose Psalm 3because it provides a concise portrait of crying out to God in the midst of great stress. David’s words are no less relevant to our modern workplace and lifestyle as they were to his battles:

Lord, how many are my foes!
How many rise up against me!

Many are saying of me,
“God will not deliver him.”

But you, Lord, are a shield around me,
my glory, the One who lifts my head high.

I call out to the Lord,
and he answers me from his holy mountain.

I lie down and sleep;
I wake again, because the Lord sustains me.

I will not fear though tens of thousands
assail me on every side.

Arise, Lord!
Deliver me, my God!
Strike all my enemies on the jaw;
break the teeth of the wicked.

From the Lord comes deliverance.
May your blessing be on your people.

Hannah’s Prayer of Praise (1 Samuel 2:1–10)

When Hannah received the child she begged God for, her first instinct is to praise the One who provided. She wants to thank Him for His greatness and His deliverance. Too often we pray before receiving, but then forget to pray after God answers. Let this prayer guide you in thanks:

“My heart exults in the Lord;
my horn is exalted in the Lord.
My mouth derides my enemies,
because I rejoice in your salvation.

“There is none holy like the Lord:
for there is none besides you;
there is no rock like our God.
Talk no more so very proudly,
let not arrogance come from your mouth;
for the Lord is a God of knowledge,
and by him actions are weighed.
The bows of the mighty are broken,
but the feeble bind on strength.
Those who were full have hired themselves out for bread,
but those who were hungry have ceased to hunger.
The barren has borne seven,
but she who has many children is forlorn.
The Lord kills and brings to life;
he brings down to Sheol and raises up.
The Lord makes poor and makes rich;
he brings low and he exalts.
He raises up the poor from the dust;
he lifts the needy from the ash heap
to make them sit with princes
and inherit a seat of honor.
For the pillars of the earth are the Lord’s,
and on them he has set the world.

“He will guard the feet of his faithful ones,
but the wicked shall be cut off in darkness,
for not by might shall a man prevail.
The adversaries of the Lord shall be broken to pieces;
against them he will thunder in heaven.
The Lord will judge the ends of the earth;
he will give strength to his king
and exalt the horn of his anointed.”

Origin:

Five Powerful Prayers

Related articles

Is Jesus God?

Here is a note I wrote to Anane in Ghana.   This note captures what I believe about my Jesus and His true identity.

Jesus

I know there are many out there who claim to be “Christian” or other similar term that question and deny that Jesus, the person who came in the flesh and was born to a woman, Mary, could be God.

By denying this they are denying events in the Old Testament. God appears many times in the Old Testament to those who put their faith in God who is Jehovah. Jesus is God in the flesh. Jesus was God in the flesh in the Old Testament. The God of the Old Testament is all powerful–He can do anything! He can and did appear to His people in the flesh.
Read more of this post

Jesus is GOD!

BLACK

and WHITE

Magdelena

Magdalena

Here is a story you will not forget very quickly.

Why did Jesus Die?

I am watching the series, A.D.–the Bible Continues on NBC and we are right in the middle of the series.   This article from the BBC in 2009 captures some of the issues depicted in A.D.–the Bible Continues.

Atonement and reconciliation

Actors representing Roman soldier nailing Jesus to a cross

Actors Reenact the Cricifixion

The events leading up to the arrest and crucifixion of Jesus are well-told by the Gospel writers, as are stories of the Resurrection. But why did Jesus die?

In the end the Roman authorities and the Jewish council wanted Jesus dead. He was a political and social trouble-maker. But what made the death of Jesus more significant than the countless other crucifixions carried out by the Romans and witnessed outside the city walls by the people of Jerusalem?

Christians believe that Jesus was far more than a political radical. For them the death of Jesus was part of a divine plan to save humanity.

The death and resurrection of this one man is at the very heart of the Christian faith. For Christians it is through Jesus’s death that people’s broken relationship with God is restored. This is known as the Atonement.

What is the atonement?

The word atonement is used in Christian theology to describe what is achieved by the death of Jesus. William Tyndale introduced the word in 1526, when he was working on his popular translation of the Bible, to translate the Latin wordreconciliatio.

In the Revised Standard Version the word reconciliation replaces the word atonement. Atonement (at-one-ment) is the reconciliation of men and women to God through the death of Jesus.

But why was reconciliation needed? Christian theology suggests that although God’s creation was perfect, the Devil tempted the first man Adam and sin was brought into the world. Everybody carries this original sin with them which separates them from God, just as Adam and Eve were separated from God when they were cast out of the Garden of Eden.

So it is a basic idea in Christian theology that God and mankind need to be reconciled. However, what is more hotly debated is how the death of Jesus achieved this reconciliation.

There is no single doctrine of the atonement in the New Testament. In fact, perhaps more surprisingly, there is no official Church definition either. But first, what does the New Testament have to say?

New Testament images

The New Testament uses a range of images to describe how God achieved reconciliation to the world through the death of Jesus. The most common is the image of sacrifice.

For example, John the Baptist describes Jesus as “the lamb of God that takes away the sins of the world”. (John 1:29)

Here are some other images used to describe the atonement:

  • a judge and prisoner in a law court
  • a payment of ransom for a slave’s freedom
  • a king establishing his power
  • a military victory

And here are some examples of how the New Testament explains the death of Jesus:

‘For the Son of Man himself did not come to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many’.

Words attributed to Jesus in Mark 10:45

‘Drink all of you from this’, he said. ‘For this is my blood, the blood of the covenant, which is to be poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.’

Words attributed to Jesus in Matthew 26:28

Well then, in the first place, I taught you what I had been taught myself, namely that Christ died for our sins, in accordance with the scriptures…

Written by Paul in 1 Corinthians 15:3

How have later writers and theologians interpreted the Biblical accounts and theologies? In varied, and sometimes conflicting, ways.

From the BBC, 2009.

Jesus’ Power

Couldn’t explain it, didn’t understand it, but I knew…

This is a reblog of an earlier blog about Billy Lind’s life.  It is relevant to a new discussion on homosexuality.

A Christian at transformation time (conversion) said that was his state.  He knew something had happened–something good! But, he didn’t understand what had happened or how it happened.  He just knew, even though he could not explain what had happened to him.

You’ll hear these phrases in this video if you want to take a look.  Now this is a real conversion from a very bad state of being.

More of Billy Lind.
Billy’s Written story

Names, Titles and Characters of Jesus Christ 8

Worship the Christ, The Savior of the World!

 

 

 

God hath given him A Name which is above every name. Phl 2:9, 10
Jesus Mat 1:21
Jesus Himself Luk 24:15
I, Jesus Rev 22:16
A Saviour, Jesus Act 13:23
The Saviour of the World 1Jo 4:14
A Saviour, which is Christ the Lord Luk 2:11
Jesus Christ Rev 1:5
The Lord Jesus Christ Col 1:2
Our Lord Jesus Christ Himself 2Th 2:16
Jesus the Christ Mat 16:20
Jesus Christ our Lord Rom 5:21
Jesus Christ the Righteous 1Jo 2:1
Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, to-day and for ever Hbr 13:8
Jesus of Nazareth Act 22:8
Jesus Christ of Nazareth Act 4:10
Lord Jesus Act 7:59
Christ Jesus 1Ti 1:15
Christ Mat 23:8
Messiah, which is called Christ Jhn 4:25
Anointed Psa 2:2; Act 4:27
Christ the Lord Luk 2:11
The Lord Christ Col 3:24
The Christ of God Luk 9:20
The Lord’s Christ Luk 2:26
The Christ, the Son of the Blessed Mar 14:61
The Christ, the Saviour of the World Jhn 4:42

Part of the Fight–Repentance!

Part of the battle we are all engaged in if we cast our lot with the Messiah and follow Jesus the Christ, is repentance.  Here is what Steve Brown has said about repentance.  This is very good.

Repentance is so often misunderstood. Repentance is not changing; it is God’s way to change us. The Greek word for ‘repent’ refers to ‘changing one’s mind.’ It isn’t changing one’s behavior as is often taught. If it is that, then there are times we can repent and other times (especially in obsessive or besetting sin) when it is simply impossible.

…For years, I taught that repenting was not just asking for forgiveness for spilling the milk… it was getting a mop and cleaning it up, and then going to the store to buy some more milk for the person who owned it. So, because I believed that, I could not repent of some bad stuff in my life and I thereby robbed myself of one of the most important and wonderful teachings of the Bible. God changes us and sanctification is as much a work of God’s grace as is justification.

…Thus, I teach that repentance isn’t changing. It is ‘knowing who you are, who God is, what you have done and going to Him with it.’ At that point the ball is in God’s court and He begins an amazing work of the Holy Spirit in making us more and more like Jesus.

From at dialogue @: The Internet Monk.

Jesus

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